What’s The Impact of Having a Father Who Was Drafted to Vietnam? Major New Finding

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…The math works like this: If sons of all draft-eligible fathers earn $268 less on average, but draft-eligible fathers were only 13 percentage points more likely to serve, then the sons of conscripted veteran fathers are probably earning $2,000 less. That’s assuming the entire effect of the draft is contained to those compelled by the draft to serve in the war.

To repeat: A man who enlisted because of the Vietnam draft probably caused his sons to earn $2,000 less a year in 2013. That’s a difference of 5 percent of average incomes. That’s a big deal. These sons were also about 25 percent more likely to join the military. Daughters were affected too, to a much lesser extent.Those are the facts. Now here come the theories. What about having a veteran father was holding these children back?…

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…Men returned from Vietnam at a disadvantage. What the draft represented was the government taking away their time — time they could have spent in school or training for a job. Of course, people learn skills in the military too, and there were other benefits of enlistment: money to go to college, preferential hiring for veterans, and the VA healthcare system.

But on balance, economists have found that men who enlisted because of the Vietnam draft started from behind, and took decades to catch up to their peers in terms of wages. During that time, not only were they were earning less, but they also tended to settle in neighborhoods that were less nice. These factors affected how their children were brought up…

Source:  Washington Post  Featured Image Source:  Time  Image Source:  Washington Post  Image Source ABC News

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